Journal of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research

EDITORIAL
Year
: 2014  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 151-

Recent advances in ocular drug delivery system


Upendra Nagaich 
 Editor, Journal of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology and Research (JAPTR), Editor-in-Chief, SPER Times Secretary, Society of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, 22-C, Jawahar Colony, Gwalior - 474 001, M.P., India

Correspondence Address:
Upendra Nagaich
Editor, Journal of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology and Research (JAPTR), Editor-in-Chief, SPER Times Secretary, Society of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, 22-C, Jawahar Colony, Gwalior - 474 001, M.P.
India




How to cite this article:
Nagaich U. Recent advances in ocular drug delivery system.J Adv Pharm Technol Res 2014;5:151-151


How to cite this URL:
Nagaich U. Recent advances in ocular drug delivery system. J Adv Pharm Technol Res [serial online] 2014 [cited 2022 Aug 15 ];5:151-151
Available from: https://www.japtr.org/text.asp?2014/5/4/151/143022


Full Text

Dear Friends,

Recent progressions have been made in pharmacological therapies to treat ocular disorders such as glaucoma, conjunctivitis, diabetic macular edema and retinal vascular occlusions to improve the diagnosis for these disorders. Due to these advances, there is a great deal of interest in minimally invasive delivery methods, which has generated rapid developments in the field of ocular drug delivery. Conventional eye drops have been restricted to eye and therapeutic drug concentrations in target tissues are not maintained for a long time. So, a vital need emerges to fabricate ocular drug delivery systems that provide controlled-release for the treatment of chronic diseases, and also enhances patient's and doctor's convenience to reduce the dosing frequency and invasive treatment. Current developments include delivery to both anterior and posterior segments of the eye. Traditional ocular dosage forms have been overcame by advance drug delivery techniques to anterior segment like contact lens, cul-de-sac inserts, punctual plugs, subconjunctival/episcleral implants, while to posterior segment includes intravitreal implants like Durasert™ Technology System, Novadur™ Technology, I-vation™ TA, NT-501 and injectable particulate systems as IBI-20089, RETAAC, Cortiject® (NOVA63035, Novagali Pharma S.A.), Visudyne® have revolutionized the ocular delivery of drugs. Furthermore, physical devices like iontophoresis and micro-electromechanical intraocular drug delivery device are non-invasive techniques of ocular drug delivery, therefore, avoids the complications of a surgical implantation or frequent dosing of intravitreal injections. Iontophoresis involves delivery of drug by the application of weak direct current which takes the charged molecules across the sclera, into the vitreous and choroid. An opposite charge ground electrode is kept elsewhere on the body to complete the circuit. EyeGate Pharmaceuticals, Inc., (Waltham, MA, US) has sign up for a pivotal phase III study of EGP-437 for dry eye syndrome therapy. EGP-437 is a dexamethasone phosphate for delivery using the EyeGate II® Delivery System. Micro-electromechanical intraocular drug delivery device is a micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) discovered for the therapy of chronic and refractory ocular diseases. Drug solution can be refilled in MEMS device, imparting a long-term drug therapy and avoid repeated surgical treatments. Replenish, Inc., (Pasadena, CA, US) set up to go into trials for Food and Drug Administration approval for a refillable and programmable pump which can be implanted in the eye to deliver drug for glaucoma. In addition, encapsulated cell technology has found its application directly to the posterior segment of the eye. It involves entrapment of immunologically isolated cells with hollow fibers or microcapsules. Certainly, further considerations should be made with the most efficacious combinations of optimal drugs, dose, route, and drug release pattern (sustained-release, pulsatile-release, or controlled-release responding to a trigger) according to the pathophysiology and progressive courses of the targeted disease.