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EDITORIAL
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 1  

Nanomedicine: Revolutionary trends in drug delivery and diagnostics


Editor, Journal of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology and Research (JAPTR), Editor in Chief, SPER Times, Secretary, Society of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, 22-C, Jawahar Colony, Gwalior - 474 001, Madhya Pradesh, India

Date of Web Publication13-Feb-2014

Correspondence Address:
Upendra Nagaich
Editor, Journal of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology and Research (JAPTR), Editor in Chief, SPER Times, Secretary, Society of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, 22-C, Jawahar Colony, Gwalior - 474 001, Madhya Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2231-4040.126977

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How to cite this article:
Nagaich U. Nanomedicine: Revolutionary trends in drug delivery and diagnostics. J Adv Pharm Technol Res 2014;5:1

How to cite this URL:
Nagaich U. Nanomedicine: Revolutionary trends in drug delivery and diagnostics. J Adv Pharm Technol Res [serial online] 2014 [cited 2020 Oct 24];5:1. Available from: https://www.japtr.org/text.asp?2014/5/1/1/126977

Nanotechnology is an emerging discipline which blooms a broad area of drug delivery and targeting. It is simply getting gigantic things from tiny world. Now days, in each discipline, whether engineering, medical or pharmacy, research is going on to get maximum benefits from latest technologies in a cost effective manner. But it needs a multidisciplinary approach to bring nanotechnology based therapies and products from laboratory to clinic. Nanotechnology makes the use of vast array of nanomaterials and nanodevices like polymeric nanoparticles, lipoidal nanoparticles, quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, dendimers and many more. These are solid colloidal particles with diameters ranging from 1 to 100 nm. They consist of macromolecular materials and can be used therapeutically as adjuvant in vaccines or drug carriers, in which the active pharmaceutical ingredient is dissolved, entrapped, encapsulated, adsorbed or chemically attached. Nanoparticles are not only capable as drug delivery carriers as they offer non-invasive routes of administration such as oral, nasal and ocular routes, but also show to be good adjuvant for vaccines. Nanoparticles reveal remarkable assurance in noninvasive imaging, early detection, and drug delivery. Nanoparticles employed for drug delivery is often termed as "nanomedicine".

Some of the most recent and novel application of nanotechnology in drug delivery is in the discipline of nanoengineered devices. Since nanoparticle-based systems for drug delivery are limited by the amount of drug that can be loaded on a single particle, and their ability to control drug release is based on a single trigger such as dissolution of the particle. There is also an increasing requirement for more intelligent systems which can carry a large quantity of active molecules and can release specific amounts in response to pulsatile stimuli over a longer period of time. Therefore, nanoscale fabrication techniques are increasingly being investigated for the device design with manageable surface properties as well as devices capable of functioning as biosensors and stimuli-sensitive delivery platforms.

Concluding the discussion, drug delivery is being considered using simple lipid-based and polymer based particles but diagnostic devices also appear to be on a fast track toward development as well.

Despite of enormous developments and revolution in the field of drug delivery, one has to focus on recent developments in the field of nanomedicine from physical basics, biological aspects, medical applications and concerns related to manufacturing, reliability and safety of nano-scale medicines.

 
  Authors Top


Dr. Upendra Nagaich



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